The D-Sign of C-Sci

CS SERIES (6)In my software design course, I recently learned about how using design patterns helps you code better. I thought it would be a good review to go over the concepts this article introduces and potentially link it to things from class and maybe even add some things we did not get through during class.

The three categories Frederico Haag, a computer science engineering student at PoliMi, wrote about are creational patterns, structural patterns, and behavioral patterns.

Based on the design pattern I chose to work on for my individual assignment, I wanted to focus on the facade section–which is a structural pattern. The main take-away of the facade is how it “provides a simplified interface to a larger body of code.” I like how the name itself actually relates to the word facade’s definition: “an outward appearance that is maintained to conceal a less pleasant or creditable reality” (Dictionary.com). As a person who likes the aesthetic side of things, this seems like a convenient design pattern, especially if people who are not working on the code end up seeing it; it may be less overwhelming to some.

Another one of the options my class had for the same assignment above is for the decorator class–which is also a structural pattern. This “adds behavior to an object dynamically without affecting the behavior of other objects from the same class.” For some reason, when I imagine this concept, I think of a decorated cake. Since it is useful for adding the same behavior to many classes; it’s like when you add a spread-out layer of fondant or frosting to a cake, it could either cover the whole section(s) of cake or just some, but it doesn’t mess up the inside of the cake.

Overall, I found this content very useful to reiterate what I had learned and Haag incorporated visual UML diagram examples along with actual snippets of code to help us compare and contrast what he was showing. The content has not changed how I think about the subject because there is no arguing here, it just shows different ways people can structure their code overall. I do appreciate how Haag also listed “typical use cases” for some of them as it makes it easier to imagine.


Article: https://medium.com/federicohaag/coding-better-using-design-patterns-4d7385a9e7ac

Up in the gym working on samFitnessed

Hey guys! Something I’ve been thinking about for a while finally became real, I created @samfitnessed on Instagram.

Feel free to follow me if you may be intimidated by the weights at the gym, need ways to stay fit outdoors or at home, or are just along for adventures; this is the fitness account for you!

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“Do you really lift if you don’t have a fitness IG?” For those who are intimidated by the weights at the gym, need ways to stay fit outdoors or at home, or are just along for adventures; this is the fitness account for you! It’s nice to meet you, I’m Sam! You can check out my main IG @sambarrassed as well. Pc: @yllekelly__ . // Current goal: being able to deadlift a plate (I learned that’s 45lb/20kg on each side plus the weight of the bar itself) . // Fitness history: I’ve been going to gyms on and off for years, going on lots of adventures, or doing at-home workouts but never tried lifting until recently (going with friends really helps)! . . #gym #workout #fitness #lifting #hiking #adventures #instalove #girlswholift #me #newinstagram #fitstagram #weights #cardio #climbing #jumping #blogilates #workoutvideos #motivation #progress #motivational #havefun #aeriereal

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No Ragrets(sion) Testing

CS SERIES (5)“Forget about automating your regression tests” is some bold advice from Bas Dijkstra, who has experience as a test automation consultant. It made me wonder what exactly led him to making this kind of statement on regression test scripts and his article, On Ending the Regression Automation Fixation, covered various reasons why.

Two reasons why Dijkstra says starting with automating your regression tests is not ideal includes regression scripts being too long and how regression tests are written from an end user perspective. I find this interesting as a lot of software bloggers are saying automation is not always going to be the answer and their answers have yet to make me disagree.

Sam CS (10)

The reason I chose this is because I am drawn to honesty; two examples above were explained with scenarios with failures Dijkstra has faced from creating inefficient or “plain worthless” cases.

This content will change the way I think about creating potential testing cases as there will be questions to ask myself before proceeding with the task(s) at hand. There will be a lot of reflecting on what could be consuming my test time, which parts are too repetitive, or what can just be done better. I mean of course I’ve already been considering these questions but now there will be a more conscious effort to think about them.

Dijkstra’s process especially considers the difference between how many scripts there could be when a computer is trying to translate what a human could have performed when testing. I realize how that would be an issue when trying to understand what could have went wrong or does not match up fully when there is less (specific) feedback when it comes to automation.

Thanks to this article, I will also try to predict how many layers of regression scripts would be too much of a hassle to develop ways for communication between what is being tested under the application. Overall, this information was useful as we should be reminded that “automation is meant to make your life and testing applications easier”; it should make sense and not be done at random, especially for regression testing.


Article: https://www.ontestautomation.com/on-ending-the-regression-automation-fixation/