Up in the gym working on samFitnessed

Hey guys! Something I’ve been thinking about for a while finally became real, I created @samfitnessed on Instagram.

Feel free to follow me if you may be intimidated by the weights at the gym, need ways to stay fit outdoors or at home, or are just along for adventures; this is the fitness account for you!

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“Do you really lift if you don’t have a fitness IG?” For those who are intimidated by the weights at the gym, need ways to stay fit outdoors or at home, or are just along for adventures; this is the fitness account for you! It’s nice to meet you, I’m Sam! You can check out my main IG @sambarrassed as well. Pc: @yllekelly__ . // Current goal: being able to deadlift a plate (I learned that’s 45lb/20kg on each side plus the weight of the bar itself) . // Fitness history: I’ve been going to gyms on and off for years, going on lots of adventures, or doing at-home workouts but never tried lifting until recently (going with friends really helps)! . . #gym #workout #fitness #lifting #hiking #adventures #instalove #girlswholift #me #newinstagram #fitstagram #weights #cardio #climbing #jumping #blogilates #workoutvideos #motivation #progress #motivational #havefun #aeriereal

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No Ragrets(sion) Testing

CS SERIES (5)“Forget about automating your regression tests” is some bold advice from Bas Dijkstra, who has experience as a test automation consultant. It made me wonder what exactly led him to making this kind of statement on regression test scripts and his article, On Ending the Regression Automation Fixation, covered various reasons why.

Two reasons why Dijkstra says starting with automating your regression tests is not ideal includes regression scripts being too long and how regression tests are written from an end user perspective. I find this interesting as a lot of software bloggers are saying automation is not always going to be the answer and their answers have yet to make me disagree.

Sam CS (10)

The reason I chose this is because I am drawn to honesty; two examples above were explained with scenarios with failures Dijkstra has faced from creating inefficient or “plain worthless” cases.

This content will change the way I think about creating potential testing cases as there will be questions to ask myself before proceeding with the task(s) at hand. There will be a lot of reflecting on what could be consuming my test time, which parts are too repetitive, or what can just be done better. I mean of course I’ve already been considering these questions but now there will be a more conscious effort to think about them.

Dijkstra’s process especially considers the difference between how many scripts there could be when a computer is trying to translate what a human could have performed when testing. I realize how that would be an issue when trying to understand what could have went wrong or does not match up fully when there is less (specific) feedback when it comes to automation.

Thanks to this article, I will also try to predict how many layers of regression scripts would be too much of a hassle to develop ways for communication between what is being tested under the application. Overall, this information was useful as we should be reminded that “automation is meant to make your life and testing applications easier”; it should make sense and not be done at random, especially for regression testing.


Article: https://www.ontestautomation.com/on-ending-the-regression-automation-fixation/

TheCurrentStateOf, SD 01110

CS SERIES (4)As someone who will be graduating within the next year, I’m always interested in what software development is currently like. Ekaterina Novoseltseva uses some 2018 statistics and presents interesting facts about software development through Apiumhub—which is a software development company based in Barcelona. The data in this article comes from a collection of over 300 answers from different countries around the world; starting with the challenges in software development.

The information collected on programming languages was interesting to me as Javascript, Java, and Python are the top three current primary programming languages for those companies. On top of that, Go is used around 6% and of the companies who are considering using another programming language in the next 12 months, Go is the second on that list. I like seeing this data to know what is currently popular and may be an upcoming popular language as this is constantly changing. Novoseltseva points out how about 37% “of respondents said they’re not planning to use any new programming languages in the coming 12 months” and it makes me wonder whether it is because they do not want to change their ways or if they are already so on top of the updates that they do not need to for now. It also makes me wonder how companies in the New England region are doing in terms of exploring new languages or ways to keep up to date on their projects.

Although I knew of the current trend(s) for the most part, I was surprised to see what Apiumhub had to conclude on software outsourcing. It shows an infographic where of the people who did outsource software development fully or partially, only 10.06% of them were “absolutely satisfied” and 51.57% were “somewhat satisfied.” Based on what I’d been hearing of people being worried of getting all the tech jobs outsourced, maybe the scare isn’t as bad as people led it on to be. I mean of course, the total majority of responses from that fall under “satisfied” but it was not fully satisfying—this would probably be best for quick, short-term fixes or work. Which shows how there is still more to people-to-people communication in the company’s direct workforce and it puts my mind at ease a little more.


Article: https://apiumhub.com/tech-blog-barcelona/interesting-facts-software-development/

Thanks for Coming to My Test Talk™

CS SERIES (3)After learning some life lessons through the pages I’ve skimmed from my copy of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey; this article’s version for software developers in test caught my eye. What exactly are the seven highly effective habits of SDETs? Here are the seven habits that Angie Jones, a senior developer advocate at Applitools, wrote about: being intentional, enhancing development skills, enhancing testing skills, exploring new tools, automating throughout the product’s tech stack, collaborating, and automating beyond the tests.

If anyone is interested in becoming a SDET, they should follow Jones’ advice as she is very familiar with interviewing SDET candidates. Something thought-provoking about the first one is how automation projects are not always the best option. Before this article, I understood that not everything required automation but it was the end goal for more projects or companies overall. This is due to my experience; for some reason I believed that just because the company I was at wanted automation for something that everyone else would too. After reading this, I am now understanding that automation is only the goal when it is aligned with the overall outcome.

I am noticing a consistent pattern of guides to becoming a good software developer or tester containing similar tips like “enhancing development skills” and “enhancing testing skills” as people in this industry must always keep learning to stay on top of what’s new. Due to the repetition, I have been trying to keep an eye out for the more unique ideas. One of the ideas that stood out to me more is the one of collaborating.

Jones listed careers ranging from business analytics to software development and mentioned how they would be good matches for pairing up with SDETs to help each other better understand certain features and the importance of what they will be working on. From a sociological standpoint, I like this approach to finding all the resources to complete a project outside of the department. As someone who is always looking for ways to connect with people or connect people to other people, this is an effective idea for helping companies and their people feel more at ease with their jobs. The SDETs may feel less pressure knowing they are not entirely on their own and can request help when necessary.


Article: https://techbeacon.com/7-habits-highly-effective-sdets

if (two < one) {

CS SERIES (2)According to music artists, two is better than one. When it comes to designing code that has two parts, this may not be the case. In Max Kanat-Alexander’s article, he explains how he has a personal rule of needing to know how generic his code needs to be. He describes it as if he were designing an audio decoder and started out with supporting WAV files and then later needed to add support for MP3 files. His solution was for what he only needed on its own instead of having to copy and paste the common parts for the format; he emphasizes that “it’s not just two implementations that are bad, but also two locations.” Another rule Kanat-Alexander has for helping this stay consistent is to create code well enough to ensure you would ideally never have to go back and change it if another part of the code has to be modified.

I found this information useful because I believe that developers are always striving to be the most efficient coders they can be. In order to do so, using two of Kanat-Alexander’s methods would help them plan to code more effectively. Just imagine the potential headache of realizing you have to go further back to code you thought was finished and then even further back when you notice a change on top of what you originally needed to make. This will probably affect how I will work in the future as it will make me sit back and think beyond the task at hand. It would allow me to save room for potential add-ons without them crisscrossing, which would allow me to skip out on having to do more rework.

At the end of the article, Kanat-Alexander notes that the reader does not have to take this as a “hard and fast law of the universe” and I appreciate how he tries to help the reader but does not try to push them to do it his way. In terms of the subject, I do not think my thoughts have changed too much as I do want to learn how to code better and I would like to continue finding out about people’s coding structure process.


Article: https://www.codesimplicity.com/post/two-is-too-many/

The BEST of TEXAS || Travel 2018

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Hey guys! Sarah and I flew down to Texas to visit our cousin Daniel in Dallas for a week this past summer. We also road-tripped to Austin and declared BUC-EE’s or bust.

I guess things really are bigger in Texas… we pit-stopped at the World’s Largest Convenience store! It had 60+ gas station pumps as well.

To see more of the BEST of Texas, check out my vlog and feel free to subscribe for more!

Some featured things or places we went:

IMG_9600Go Ape Ziplining & Adventure
Mitsuwa Japanese Supermarket
Pecan Lodge
Summit Climbing, Yoga, & Fitness
Melt Ice Creams
Ronald Kirk Walking Bridge/Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge
Ramen Tatsu-Ya Austin
Mozart’s Coffee Roasters (by the lake)
Lady Bird Lake, Austin (Rowing Dock Stand Up Paddle-Boarding)
Watching the bats from Congress Ave Bridge
Shinjuku Station
Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth
—If anything you want to know isn’t listed yet just ask!

 

Testing, Testing. QAn You Hear Me?

CS SERIES (1)To kick off this series, I wanted to introduce why Software Quality Assurance (SQA) testing is important not only for testers to understand, but for developers as well. From my experience, I’ve become familiar with manual testing and exploring different types of automated testing for web applications. I wanted to know a little more about how being a good developer also includes being a good tester and found an article on SimpleProgrammer which reveals the importance of knowing how to test.

John Sonmez, the founder of SimpleProgrammer, says that he “owe[s] a large amount of the success [he] ha[s] had in [his] career as a software developer to [his] background in testing.” I can see why he feels that way, as using just a little more time to double-check what you have created could save you even more time in the long-run. For instance, if something you have spent hours working on seems complete and you do not double-check it and pass it on to a QA team, you have to wait for someone in QA or a testing platform to check it. That could take anywhere between minutes to a few days or more. Once it is QA tested, maybe a bug is found and your task falls back into your hands again.

Could the scenario above been preventable? Yes and no. It is a true that “you can never find all the bugs or defects in a piece of [theoretical] software and you can never test every possible input into the [theoretical] software” but you can try your best. This doesn’t necessarily mean having to do your own end-to-end regression testing through the entire software each time you add a minuscule feature but you should thoroughly check what you have changed and the features directly connected to it.

The article continues to describe common testing forms and what they each mean for developers. Sonmez supports the Agile cycle of software development and describes it in the article as well.


Article: https://simpleprogrammer.com/software-developers-know-testing-qa/