The Deep End || Sam’s Ships S.S.3

Sams Ships (2)On today’s installment of the individual apprenticeship patterns series, we’re going to discuss The Deep End. The main takeaway of The Deep End is that you should throw yourself into an opportunity even if you are hesitating or unsure. Of course, it is not necessarily telling you to be reckless, it also emphasizes how it is your responsibility to offset the risks of your approach.

I found that this pattern was interesting because as a person, I continuously try to say yes to trying new things or taking on new roles when the opportunity arises. The Deep End is basically the pattern that represents that mindset and reinforces how important trying something you might think is “risky” turns into being one of the best choices you ever made.

The pattern has caused me to change the way I think about software development/engineering based on the “action” it tells us to consider; which is learning to see what choices are affecting where our career is heading and eventually learn how to make choices based on it. I will try to focus on not only reflecting and reviewing what has happened but I will also move forward by actively making decisions based on experiences.

I do not disagree with something in this pattern so far as the “risks” I have taken so far have always turned out bettering me as a person or helped me achieve something greater. Things like taking on new roles within Enactus when I was unsure about how much time it would take on top of my already busy schedule to how to actually do things were part of my worries. In the end, it turned out alright because I was able to work things around my schedule and people who knew what the role(s) consisted of were there for me as a resource or form of support.

Overall, I am pretty content with the things I have jumped into because like Enrique from the Jumping in With Both Feet story, I eventually felt “like a fish in water.” I liked being able to read about someone’s success story of an instance where they went after something and thought “hey, the worst thing that could happen is I don’t like it and I fly back.”

Sam’s Ships || Apprenticeship Patterns CH1 & CH 2-6 Intro

csseries281829Welcome aboard! Today we are going to discuss Apprenticeship Patterns based on the book by Adewale Oshineye and Dave Hoover.

What it means to be a software craftsman is to be on a continuous journey to absorb new things and implement them, then taking the time to reflect. To me, being a software craftsman seems like a journey to do better, seek more, and learn from experiences while remembering where you came from.

The three stages of becoming a software craftsman are the apprentice, the journeyman, and the master. Based on those, I thought it was reassuring to read about what changes in each modern-day phase, like a guide or what to expect or what may happen in the technology world with software development. It seems useful because instead of having a core timeline of expectations, it was more based on how people personally developed or tried to grow and learn more.

I found two sentences on the apprenticeship phase thought-provoking, “Th[e] transition [out of apprenticeship] may take longer for some people than for others. For some, the transition may take longer than their professional careers.” It made me think about whether people were settling or just not able to have the right resources to continue growing. Or maybe they had just switched into technology on the further end of their career spectrum.

The reading also made me think about the cycle of knowledge; an apprentice learns from a master, becomes a journeyman, and then hopefully becomes a master as well who ends up teaching skills to newfound apprentices. There was a time before our jobs and there will be a time after our jobs.

The chapter introductions which seem most relevant to me are two and three. From chapter two, I liked how we are encouraged to get really good at a language but not rely on it so that we can continue branching out and learning more. It made me more grateful for sites available today that just serve as online courses to teach and guide you to learning new languages from the beginning.

From chapter three, it feels very relevant to read about “valu[ing] learning and long-term growth opportunities over salary and traditional notions of leadership.” As I will be graduating in only a few months from now, I will have to make an important decision on my first official career. This was an interesting perspective after all the current trends of always hustling and being on the grind and people moving to bustling technology cities.  I will most likely be writing about some points brought up in future blog posts as well.

Overall, this book seems pretty reassuring in terms of helping a reader slow down for a little bit and think about what path they are on and which ones they are willing to cross as well. It helped me reflect on what I have learned so far and what I may want to focus on in the future.

 

QAn’t Wait to See You Again

CS SERIES (16)Before I dive into my final installment of this CS series (for now), I wanted to say thank you if you actually read any of these posts and thank you to my new followers for dealing with the notifications you must have gotten.

For this last post, I wanted to discuss the article 5 Reasons You Are Wasting Your Testing Time by Joel Montvelisky. The author expresses how everyone can do testing but not everyone can do “good testing,” which incorporates more than just what is basic checking.

A short list of main reasons why a lot of people tend to waste time that could have been spent testing other things includes:

  • Not having clear goals
  • Not understanding what or how much the feature means to your End User
  • Not keeping track of what was tested and potential discoveries
  • Not consulting what you already know or using references
  • Not giving feedback that could be shared to help others

Sam CS (22)I agree with most of what Montvelisky says as I have personally noticed what has happened from my experience as a Software Quality Assurance Intern when any of the five things above took place based on a task. It is important to understand that sometimes these things may be out of your control but you should still try your best to avoid miscommunication wherever possible.

Montvelisky’s content has not necessarily changed the way I will work as I have already been consciously making an effort to understand what I am reviewing, how stuff is meant to work, logging tasks, connecting tasks to previous occurrences, and communicating with the QA team. If I had read this article before I started working, it would have been more useful as it would serve as a foundation to how one should think of testing beyond the basic functionalities.

Something I wanted to emphasize is the post-test reviews and feedback sessions with peers. I found that if someone else needed to learn about a project or a task had to be communicated with a client, logging any kinds of notes or information was better than not having anything prepared to discuss. They do not necessarily have to be posted for everyone to access but it would be good to note it in any sort of text editor for future reference. I think an example of when to note things is if you found something that does not prevent your current task from being approved but it still affects something for the overall program.

Overall, when testing things I believe you should trust your instincts on reporting things you find. It helps when you try to imagine how much it could affect a program in the long run if not brought to someone’s attention, even if it may seem minimal.

Best of Luck,

Sam


Article: https://qablog.practitest.com/5-reasons-you-are-wasting-your-testing-time/

Test Yourself Before You Wreck Yourself

CS SERIES (14)Testing, testing. I may need your approval on this article I read by Software Testing Magazine on Approval Testing. Approval testing, as defined by this article, is a way of software testing that results in presenting the before and after of an application for a user (ex: software development team) to review it and potentially approve it. It’s more of a visual representation of testing and one of the major cons is how the results have to be checked manually.

Some testing tools mentioned include: Approval Tests, TextTest, Jest, Recheck, Automated Screenshot Diff, Depicted (dpxdt), and etc.

The main purpose of the software testing tool, using TextTest for example, is checking that the text output after running program from the command line in different ways.

What I found interesting is how a user can see that a test technically could have “passed” or “failed” but still decide to mark it as the other because they choose what feature they are looking for in the end. This makes it a little more flexible to use approval testing as it is more of a guide or guideline for a user instead of only seeing one word and then a short description of what could have gone wrong. I think this process is much more transparent or descriptive with a user about what could have gone wrong or what went right.

One way the content has changed how I will think about the testing is how there are so many more types of software or programs out there than we can imagine which help us better code or create our own software and programs. This one is especially good for visual coders and testers who like to see their results firsthand to compare what they are expecting with what they actually got.

Overall, I found this article was useful because it introduced me to thinking about a better way of logging the differences between what the reference result is versus the actual result. I did not disagree with any of it since it showed us how we can use approval testing to our advantage while still being honest about its limitations.


Article: http://www.softwaretestingmagazine.com/knowledge/approval-testing/

Day in the Life of a Tech Intern || Video

Ever wondered what it was like to work for a tech company? Here’s a perspective from an entry-level/intern position at ten24 Digital Solutions!

Hi I’m Sam, a rising senior in uni! Throughout the past ~2 months I’ve been working at a company downtown and brought my camera to work one day to vlog what it’s like.

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I truly appreciate how welcoming everyone at ten24 was, it makes it hard for me to believe I’ve only been a part of the team for two months so far! I didn’t even know this was possible but my love for technology grew even more through learning to use different software tools that I wouldn’t have known existed until now.

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This is the 1st video of my internship series, feel free to stay tuned for more including ‘what’s in my bag’ and internship advice.

Shout out to Nina for helping me film that ending and eventually climbing into the backseat for a better shot haha!

Side note; working here has it’s perks like being in super-walking distance to city events and local coffee shops, lunch spots, and more!

Until next time, I’ll

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Best,

Sami